France 1954 -> Homeclick!

Cette page en françaisCliquez!

The 1954 French flap:

The index page for the 1954 French flap section of this website is here.

< Previous  All  Next >

Between November 18 and 24, 1954, Vasselay, Cher:

Reference for this case: 18/24-Nov-54-Vasselay.
Please cite this reference in any correspondence with me regarding this case.

Summary:

In his 1966 book "Les Phénomènes Insolites de l'Espace", ufologist Jacques Vallée published in a "Preliminary Catalog of 500 observations", that there had been an observation on December 7, 1954, at Fontland in the Cher department.

In 1997, ufologist and author Jean Sider told much more in his book "Le Dossier 1954 et l'Imposture Rationaliste", reporting what he found in the newspaper Le Berry Républicain for December 7, 1954.

On a date that Jean Sider estimated to be between November 18 and 24, 1954, at 7:20 p.m., in Vasselay in the Cher, Jean-Guy Chagnoux, 13 and a half years old, was returning by bicycle from the hamlet of Fontland, when he saw a ball of fire about 60 centimeters in diameter, at a few hundred meters away, above Camille Lanoue's farm.

This luminous mass was moving slowly in the direction of the teenager, who took fright and accelerated. The ball increased in volume and placed itself vertically, lighting up the road violently, arriving a few meters from the boy and giving off an intense red-orange light, while its spherical shape became oval.

Its size was now 7-8 meters long, and it moved silently. The teenager stopped and so did the ball. The teenager resumed his trip, and the ball did the same.

Approaching the road from Saint-Eloy to Vasselay, the teenager turned at a right angle, and the ball continued straight ahead and disappeared.

It reappeared 200 meters further in front of the teenager, huge and dazzling, leaving behind a large trail of smoke.

When the teenager arrived at La Jonchère, the thing rose slowly and, still in silence, disappeared after having lit the house of the rural policeman.

The witness was the nephew of Robert Patient, witness to a well-known sighting a few weeks earlier in the same area.

Reports:

[Ref. gqy1:] GUY QUINCY:

Scan.

December 7 [, 1954]

07:30 p.m.: Fontland (Vasselay--Cher): oval lumin. obj. 7-8 m long., chasing bicycle

[Ref. gqy2:] GUY QUINCY:

Scan.

December 7, 1954: Fontland (commune Vasselay--8 km INS at the / ?) N. of Bourges--Cher):(Lumin.oval craft 7-8 m long/ chasing bicycle in low altitude flight)

[Ref. jve5:] JACQUES VALLEE:

415 07 12 1954 (FONTLAND-CHER) F 001 3G

[Ref. jsr1:] JEAN SIDER:

Jean Sider reports what he found in the newspaper Le Berry Républicain for December 7, 1954.

On a date that Jean Sider estimated to be between the 18th and the 24th of November, 1954, at 07:20 p.m., in Vasselay in the department of Cher, Jean-Guy Chagnoux, aged 13 and a half, was returning on his bicycle of the hamlet of Fontland, when he saw at a few hundreds of meters a ball of fire of approximately 0 meters 60 in diameter above the exploitation of Mr. Camille Lanoue.

This luminous mass moved slowly in the direction of the teenager, who became afraid and sped up. The ball increased its volume and came overhead, violently illuminating the road. The phenomenon was not more than a a few meters of the young boy and emitted an intense light of red-orange color, and its spherical form became oval.

Its size was now 7 to 8 meters of length, and it moved without any noise. The teenager stopped and the ball stopped too. The teenager resumed his travel, and the ball did the same.

Approaching the road of St Eloy in Vasselay, the teenager turned at a right angle, and the ball continues straight on and disappeared.

It reappeared 200 meters further in front of the teenager, enormous and dazzling, and leaving behind itself a large trail of smoke.

When the teenager arrived in La Jonchère, the thing rose gently and still in silence, and disappeared after having lit the house of the forest warden one.

The witness was the nephew of Robert Patient, another witness of a well-known observation a few weeks before in the same sector.

[Ref. uda1:] "UFODNA" WEBSITE:

The website indicates that on 7 December 1954 in Fontland, France, "An object was sighted that had an appearance and performance beyond the capability of known earthly aircraft. One object, about 10 feet across, was observed."

The sources are indicated as Vallee, Jacques, Computerized Catalog (N = 3073); Vallee, Jacques, Challenge to Science: The UFO Enigma, Henry Regnery, Chicago, 1966; Vallee, Jacques, Preliminary Catalog (N = 500), (in JVallee01).

[Ref. ubk1:] "UFO-DATENBANK":

Case Nr. New case Nr. Investigator Date of observation Zip Place of observation Country of observation Hour of observation Classification Comments Identification
19541207 07.12.1954 Fontland France CE I
19541207 07.12.1954 Fontland France CE I

[Ref. jqy1:] JEAN DE QUERCY:

18/16 - 1954 between November 18 and 24 - Vasselay

On a date that Jean Sider estimated to be between November 18 and 24, 1954, at 7:20 p.m., in Vasselay in the Cher department, Jean-Guy Chagnoux, 13 and a half years old, was returning by bicycle from the hamlet of Fontland, when he saw a ball of fire about 0.6 meters in diameter a few hundred meters away above Camille Lanoue's farm.

This luminous mass moved slowly in the direction of the teenager. The latter took fright and accelerated the pace. The ball increased in volume and was placed at its vertical, illuminating the road violently. The phenomenon was only a few meters away from the young boy and gave off an intense orange-red light, and its spherical shape became oval. Its size was then 7 to 8 meters long and it moved without the slightest noise. The teenager stopped and so did the ball. The teenager resumed his journey and the ball did the same. Approaching the road from Saint Eloy to Vasselay, the teenager turned at a right angle, and the ball continued straight and disappeared. It reappears 200 meters further in front of the teenager, huge and dazzling, leaving behind a big trail of smoke.

When the teenager arrived in Jonchère, the thing rose slowly and still silently, and disappeared after lighting up the country policeman's house.

(Sources: In Le Berry Républicain of November 7, 1954. - "Dossier 1954" J Sider pp. 131-132)

Explanations:

Map.

Vallée gave the date "December 7, 1954" but obviously this is the date of publication in the press, not the date of the sighting. There was obviously no precise date, Sider giving an interval, Vallée had to content himself with entering his date without perhaps even knowing that it was a publication date and not an observation date.

There was indeed a Camille Lanoue in Vasselay at that time: there is no longer a Lanoue in Vasselay now, according to the phonebook anyway.

I couldn't find a "La Jonchère" in the area, the closest being a "La Jonchère"... 40 km away. I also haven't found any "Jonchères" or "Jachère" in the area so far.

At the start of the observation, the witness "was returning by bicycle from the hamlet of Fontland", and saw the ball of fire "a few hundred meters away", "above Camille Lanoue's farm" and coming towards him.

The ball came towards the witness, "placed itself vertically", violently illuminating the road - we do not know which one, but a road between Fontland and Vasselay.

Approaching "the road from Saint-Eloy to Vasselay", the teenager "turns" and the ball "continued straight ahead and disappeared."

It "reappeared 200 meters ahead of the teenager, huge and dazzling, leaving behind a huge trail of smoke."

When the teenager "arrived at Jonchère", the thing rose slowly and "disappeared after having lit the house of the country guard."

So I think the route followed is probably the one indicated in red:

The "farm of Camille Lanoue" may have been "La Brosse", but it is not obvious. The bend is there, before the farm.

Map.

The sizes given, "0.6 meters" at the start then "7 to 8 meters" when passing over the witness, are obviously impressions of apparent size.

The clues of a meteor are:

The disappearance then reappearance can be caused by an obstacle to the sight. The witness probably passed in front of "La Brosse", when the supposed meteor was moving away, it is perhaps this farm which hid the supposed meteor, then let it be seen again.

It is not known how far before the turn the witness saw the "ball" for the first time; it was maybe a few meters before the turn. If he then passed in front of the farm "La Brosse" and passed it, he must have traveled about 500 meters.

If he had traveled 500 meters, by bike (he accelerates), if he had been at 10 km per hour, the distance would have been covered in three minutes. It is a bit long for a meteor; but it is an approximation, thus not fatal.

Another "obstacle" to this explanation would be the rise of the thing at the end of the observation; but it can be done if the meteor bounced off the atmosphere. This requires that it arrives at a low angle, which then results in a possibly long passage time, longer than that of a falling meteor at a high angle.

So, for the moment, while waiting to locate the Lanoue farm, the country-guard house and "La Jonchère", I think a meteor is likely but not assured.

Keywords:

(These keywords are only to help queries and are not implying anything.)

Vasselay, Cher, Jean-Guy Chagnoux, ball, fire, luminous, slow, fast, acceleration, night, frightened, illuminated, silent, manoeuver, red, orange, bicycle, smoke

Sources:

[----] indicates sources that are not yet available to me.

Document history:

Version: Created/Changed by: Date: Change Description:
0.1 Patrick Gross October 25, 2005 First published.
1.0 Patrick Gross May 25, 2009 Conversion from HTML to XHTML Strict. First formal version.
1.1 Patrick Gross February 28, 2010 Addition [uda1].
1.2 Patrick Gross July 1, 2010 Addition [jve5].
1.3 Patrick Gross November 22, 2016 Addition [ubk1].
1.4 Patrick Gross November 22, 2021 Addition of the Summary. Explanations changed, were "Not looked for yet."
1.5 Patrick Gross December 3, 2021 Additions [gqy1], [gqy2].
1.6 Patrick Gross March 29, 2022 Addition [jqy1].

Valid XHTML 1.0 Strict



 Feedback  |  Top  |  Back  |  Forward  |  Map  |  List |  Home
This page was last updated on March 29, 2022.